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Edmonton Composting Company fined by City over Odour Issues

An Edmonton composting company, which has operated under an environmental enforcement order since 2011 and been identified in hundreds of public complaints, has agreed to pay $3,500 worth of nuisance odour tickets. CleanIt GreenIt, based in west Edmonton, said it struck a plea bargain with the Crown to pay the fine equivalent of 14 of 33 city bylaw violations ($250 per fine) and avoid court proceedings.

CleanIt GreenIt claims that they are not the sole source of odour in the vicinity.  It claims that sewers, wells and construction sites also periodically emit foul odours.  CleanIt GreenIt is calling for a review of the city’s odour nuisance bylaw, claiming the tickets were issued without scientific facts or proper investigation.  The company states that it was responsible for only 21 of the 149 odour complaints it received in 2020 and investigated.

The company claims that it regularly patrol neighbouring communities and respond rapidly to any reports of smells from its Composting Site. Its patrollers are specially trained to monitor, investigate and report on odour events. It issued a statement defending it position.

Since February 2020, the city said it has received nearly 300 odour complaints about CleanIt GreenIt.  The city said it stopped issuing tickets in February due to the “large amount of bylaw tickets” and COVID-19-related court delays.

Neighbours started a petition to shut the facility down.  It has over 2,000 signatires.

CleanIt GreenIt has been operating at 204 Street and 113 Avenue in Edmonton since November 1998. The city said it has received complaints about the company since 2003.

In 2011, the province issued an enforcement order under the Environmental Protection and Enhancement Act for multiple violations including “failure to contain odours onsite.”  The order also indicates CleanIt GreenIt has been the subject of public complaints since March 2004.

Halifax moving ahead with $288 million composting facility

The Halifax Regional Municipality (HRM), Nova Scotia recently awarded Harbour City Resources (HCR), a consortium of companies, with the contract to Design-Build-Own-Operate-Transfer (DBOOT) a composting facility under a Public-Private-Partnership (PPP) with a 25 – 35 year operations and maintenance period.  The new facility will be able to deal with 60,000 tonnes of organic waste a year.

Maple Reinders, headquartered in Ontario, is the managing partner of HCR.  Maple Reinders affiliate company AIM Environmental Group is a partner in HCR and will provide both proprietary technology to the facility as well as the long-term operations and maintenance services.

Since 2014, the municipality has been working towards developing a new organics management facility to process residential green cart materials and commercial organics. As part of the planning steps, the condition of the existing two composting facilities was assessed, a business case for a new facility was developed, and comprehensive public engagement was completed with the findings incorporated into the requirements for the development of a new facility.

HCR’s design for the Halifax composting facility builds on an already established technology and design. Modern features for the proposed facility include:

  • Compost Quality – the compost being produced at the new facility will meet the 2010 NS Environment Composting Facility Guidelines.
  • Odour Control – the proposed facility design incorporates significant measures to mitigate odours, including the use of air lock doors which means that odours from the facility cannot escape to the surrounding community.
  • Energy Efficiency – the proposed facility includes LED lighting and will take advantage of the heat generated from the compost process, and rooftop rainwater collection.
  • Water Negative Process – Unlike the existing composting facilities, this proposed facility is water negative and won’t produce a leachate that will need to be treated off-site.
  • New Use of By-products – Ammonium sulphate, generated from the odour control system, can be marketed as a fertilizer product for the agriculture industry.

Once complete, the new facility will replace two aging facilities and will position HRM well into the future with respect to sustainable management and recycling of organic waste material from residents and commercial producers. The facility incorporates Canada’s most advanced compost screening infrastructure and will create a Class A compost product from the Municipality’s organic waste material. AIM Environmental Group presently operates one of these aging facilities for HRM and will assume management of both facilities during the design, construction, and commissioning phases of the process.

Harbour City Resources has built and operated facilities in Calgary, Hamilton and Guelph, Ontario.

Final contract negotiations and execution are anticipated to be completed in early 2021.  The new facility is anticipated to begin construction in 2021 and will take approximately two to three years to complete.

 

City of Hamilton charged for Odour Issues from Composting Facility

The City Hamilton, Ontario along with several contractors was recently charged under the Ontario Environmental Protection Act in connection with odour issues at its Central Composting Facility.  The specific charges are that the City, along with contractors for the composting facility, discharged or permitted the discharge of a contaminate (odour) contrary to the Environment Protection Act.

The charge relates to issues at the composting facility back in 2018.  At that time, there were numerous odour complaints from residents living near the facility.  The odour issues resulted in the facility be ordered to shut down at the time.

After modifications to better control odour issues, the facility reopened in 2019.  It ran a one-third capacity and only accepted grass and leaf & yard waste.  A third-party was also hired to patrol the area surrounding facility to monitor for air quality impacts, though that effort is now over.

The city-owned facility opened in 2006 and is operated by Aim Environmental Group. It initially handled compost generated by Hamilton, Halton and Simcoe County — the equivalent of 60,000 tonnes per year, from roughly 1,668,000 people.

The city says it received a summons from the Ministry of Environment on Nov. 25 and is required to appear before the Ontario Court of Justice on Feb. 3.  The Environment Ministry launched an investigation following complaints about the odour and the city says it has fully cooperated.

Quebec Government commits to Province-wide composting by 2025

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The Quebec government recently announced that is was putting $1.2 billion towards a composting strategy that will result in all citizens in the province having  access to composting services come 2025 and with the fully implemented by 2030.  In addition to providing composting services to citizens across the province, the plan is to manage composting in all industries, businesses and institutions by 2025 as well, in the goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 270,000 tonnes per year by 2030.

“We are taking another step forward by investing $1.2 billion to divert organic matter from disposal sites and ensure their recovery, which will significantly contribute to reducing our greenhouse gas emissions,” Benoit Charette, Quebec Environment Minister said in a statement. “Thanks to the support of the government and the municipalities, the entire population as well as industries, businesses and institutions will be able to contribute to an even healthier management of our residual materials.”

Currently, only 57 per cent of Quebecers have access to food waste collection services. The province’s waste totals in at 5.8 million tons per year, 60 per cent of which is organic matter. The waste sector also emits around 4.55 million tonnes of CO2 equivalent per year and is the fifth largest contributor in the province.

The new strategy aims to adapt collection services as well as processing facilities to Quebec’s many regions. To promote composting and limit waste, the government is increasing landfill charges from $23.51 to $30 per ton.  Charette said this sends a clear signal that Quebec intends to discourage the elimination of residual materials in favour of their recovery.

The government claims that for this strategy to work, all actors, including those at the municipal level, must share responsibilities – and it says it plans on helping them better manage their green waste and improving their ecocentres to do so. Quebec will work with municipalities to speed up the establishment of collection services and processing facilities. In addition, the province will promote the quality of the organic matter treated and the development of local outlets for composts and other residual fertilizing materials from this collection.

The program to reduce, recover and recycle organic materials from industries, businesses and institutions, administered by Recyc-Québec, will be awarded $9.6 million. The Crown corporation is also responsible for a new recognition program for sorting centres for construction, renovation and demolition residue. That program is the result of concerted discussions with the residual materials management industry.

In summary, the goals of Quebec’s compost strategy are as follows:

  • Offer the collection of organic matter to all citizens of Quebec by 2025.
  • Manage organic matter in 100 per cent of industries, businesses and institutions by 2025.
  • Recycle or recover 70 per cent of the organic matter targeted by 2030.
  • Reduce 270,000 tonnes of CO2 equivalent per year in greenhouse gas emissions by 2030.

The plan also intends to allocate funds to programs that finance the management of organic matter, which will help boost green infrastructures. The government says this will help boost the province’s economic recovery.

 

New B.C. Program aims to keep organic waste from landfill

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The Government of British Columbia recently announced that it is partnering with the federal and local governments on the new Organics Infrastructure Program. The $30-million program will help communities expand their infrastructure, diverting organic waste away from landfills. It will also help the Province meet its CleanBC commitment to help communities achieve 95% organic waste diversion for agricultural, industrial and municipal waste.

Organic waste currently represents 40% of material sent to municipal landfills in B.C. and generates 7.5% of the province’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In total, the projects are expected to reduce nearly 300,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent over the next decade. This is like removingmore than 100,000 cars from the roads for a year.

The Organics Infrastructure Program combines $10 million in federal funding from the Low Carbon Economy Leadership Fund, $10 million from the Province, and $10 million in matching funds from local government applicants and their partners. Among the projects are two from the Central Kootenay Regional District — Central landfill composting facility and the Creston landfill composting facility — that, together, provide the region with food-waste processing capacity for the first time. Another recipient is the Northern Rockies Regional Municipality’s worm composting facility. It will divert organic waste from Fort Nelson’s landfill and create high-quality soil.

“This program will help communities, the Province and Canada meet our shared climate action goals,” said George Heyman, B.C.’s Minister of Environment and Climate Change Strategy. “It will also help build B.C.’s clean economy by creating green jobs and setting the stage for the economic opportunities that come from the reuse of organic materials.” 

“Investing in better infrastructure for waste management will divert organic waste from municipal landfills and turn it into clean and useful compost,” said Jonathan Wilkinson, federal Minister of Environment and Climate Change. “Initiatives such as this one are key to fighting climate change and helping us reach net-zero emissions by 2050. I congratulate the Province of British Columbia for its leadership in this effort.”

Twelve projects have finalized agreements to date. Additional projects are expected to come on board in the coming months. The initial projects are expected to break ground starting in the spring.

Organics Program Receipiants

The 12 projects in 10 B.C. that are to receive funding are listed below. Additional projects are expected to be approved in the coming months. The dollar values below represent the provincial funding portion only. The money will be distributed over three fiscal years to support project planning, design and construction.

Central Coast

  • Central Coast organics compost diversion initiative (Phase 1): $49,092
  • Projected GHG reductions (tCO2e): 950
  • This project, led by the Central Coast Regional District, is the first phase of a composting facility that will allow Bella Coola to divert organic waste from its landfill for the first time and enhance services to the Nuxalk Nation.

Central Kootenay

  • Central landfill composting facility: $776,053
  • Projected GHG reductions (tCO2e): 68,873
  • Creston landfill composting facility: $ 485,745
  • Projected GHG reductions (tCO2e): 15,890
  • Two complementary projects, led by the Regional District of Central Kootenay, will provide processing capacity for food waste for the first time in the regional district. These projects represent strong partnerships within and outside the regional district as one of the facilities will also service part of the Regional District of Kootenay Boundary.

Columbia Shuswap

  • Revelstoke composting facility: $100,000
  • Projected GHG reductions (tCO2e): 61,465
  • This project, led by the Columbia Shuswap Regional District, will allow residents and businesses from the City of Revelstoke and Electoral Area B to divert food waste from the landfill for the first time. Over half the waste entering the Revelstoke landfill is organic. This project will create a usable compost product, prolong the existing landfill life and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Comox Valley

  • Regional organic composting facility additional capacity: $484,815
  • Projected GHG reductions (tCO2e): 37,489
  • This project, led by theComox Valley Regional District, means the communities of Campbell River, Courtenay, Comox and Cumberland will be able to compost an extra 1,625 tonnes of food waste per year, supporting the regional district’s waste diversion target of 70% by 2022.

East Kootenay

  • There are three projects being funded in the Regional District of East Kootenay that work together to support a regional system. These projects are in the Columbia Valley, Elk Valley and central subregions, providing coverage throughout the region.
  • East Kootenay regionally integrated resource recovery network: Columbia Valley site: $333,160
  • Projected GHG reductions (tCO2e): 25,442
  • East Kootenay regionally integrated resource recovery network: central sub-region site: $333,160
  • Projected GHG reductions (tCO2e): 13,539
  • East Kootenay regionally integrated resource recovery network: Elk Valley site: $333,160
  • Projected GHG reductions (tCO2e): 42,563

Kootenay Boundary

  • Regional District of Kootenay Boundary organics diversion expansion project: $1,182,006
  • Projected GHG reductions (tCO2e): 2,873
  • This project will expand the regional district’s organics processing capacity to include food-waste materials from the industrial, commercial and institutional sector throughout the Boundary region and initiate food-waste collection for residents of Greenwood. This expanded facility will primarily process food waste, wood, yard and garden waste from the City of Grand Forks.

Northern Rockies

  • Northern Rockies vermicomposting(worm) facility: $222,546
  • Projected GHG reductions (tCO2e): 2,273
  • This project will divert organic waste from Fort Nelson’s landfill through a vermicomposting facility; red wiggler worms work with fungi, bacteria and other invertebrates to transform organic matter into “castings,” which can be used in municipal landscaping or residential gardening.

Okanagan-Similkameen

  • Oliver landfill residential food waste compost facility: $400,000
  • Projected GHG reductions (tCO2e): 4,014
  • This project, led by the regional district, provides the Oliver and Osoyoos landfill service areas with a new composting facility that will process residential food waste, agricultural waste and yard waste. This project is part of a larger regional strategy to manage organic wastes in the regional district. 

Summerland

  • Summerland organics processing facility: $790,500
  • Projected GHG reductions (tCO2e): 24,548
  • The District of Summerland will benefit from the relocated organics processing site as the move will increase capacity, upgrade operational and environmental technology and create high-quality Class A compost streams. The project will divert additional organic waste, preventing it from being landfilled and, therefore, reduce greenhouse gases, while prolonging the existing landfill life.

New Composting Facility Planned on Vancouver Island

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As reported in the Campbell River Mirror, Comox Strathcona Waste Management (CSWM) is considering two properties as potential locations for an organics composting facility. The project picks up on work started by the City of Campbell River, British Columbia, which had applied for a grant that was unsuccessful back in 2015.

The Comox Strathcona Waste Management (CSWM) service is a function of the Comox Valley Regional District, a community of 66,500 people located within an area of 1,725 square kilometres on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. The CSWM service manages over 100,000 tonnes of waste and recycled material annually and oversees a number of diversion and education programs for the CVRD and the Strathcona Regional District (SRD). 

CSWM uses three service providers for private curbside garbage and recycling pickup services:  Emterra Group, Progressive Waste Solutions, and SunCoast Waste Services.

The Comox Strathcona Solid Waste Management Plan targets a 70 per cent waste diversion rate for the Comox Strathcona Waste Management (CSWM) service area by 2022, and the greatest remaining opportunity to meet this target is the diversion of food waste from the waste stream.

CSWM has been partnering with the Village of Cumberland and the Town of Comox to pilot an organics collection program as part of the region’s commitment to reduce the amount of food in the waste stream.

CSWM Leaf and Yard Waste Composting Operations

CSWM adopted the organics composting project from the City of Campbell River and received an Infrastructure Canada grant in 2017 for a regional site. That year, Infrastructure Canada announced funding of $5.5 million for the facility, with the remaining $2.77 million of the then-$8.3 million project to be funded locally. A recent consultant’s report estimated the costs now would likely be just over $12 million because additional tonnage capacity proposed for the facility and increasing construction costs.

Part of the rationale for siting the operation in Campbell River is to take advantage of “back-haul” opportunities, by filling trucks from Campbell River with garbage for the landfill in the Comox Valley and bringing trucks back with organics from the Comox Valley for the Campbell River facility, once the landfill in Campbell River closes and garbage is taken to the regional site in the Comox Valley.

The area identified in the application in Infrastructure Canada for funding was at the Norm Wood Environmental Centre, which has been providing wastewater treatment for the city since 1996, as the location for the organics facility, one reason being to cut down on transport costs.

As reported by the Campbell River Mirror, CSWM senior solid waste manager Andrew McGifford discussed details of the planned organics composting facility board members during a recent CSWM meeting. The project will be tendered as a design-build-operate (DBO) facility.

The location of the proposed facility will be either the Norm Wood Environment Centre or an location identified as “Block J” adjacent to the Campbell River Waste Management Centre, the current landfill west of the city.

Comox Strathcona Waste Management

Besides finding a site of the proposed composting facility and making preparations for a Requests for Proposal of a DBO operation, the CSWM has also been in seriously considering the use of waste-to-energy as an option for management of waste in the future. In 2018, the CSWM board approved two directors and one senior staff person to tour a Sustane Technologies facility while in Nova Scotia. Sustane Technologies Inc. is a cleantech company has developed a processes to transform municipal solid waste into high value fuels and recyclable materials. 

Montreal has approved construction of a $175-million composting plant

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The City Council of Montreal recently voted to approve the construction of a $175-million composting plant in St-Laurent borough. Suez Canada Waste Services Inc. will build the facility.

New provincial laws regulating odours added to the costs of the facility, said Coun. Émilie Thuillier, vice-chair of the city’s contract review committee.

Thuiller also said officials have chosen to entrust the design, construction, operation and maintenance of the future plant to a single bidder rather than splitting these responsibilities into several contracts, as usual. This, she explained, made for imprecise estimates.

Originally budgeted at $46 million by the City of Montreal, the estimated cost of the new compositng plant has jumped to $175,445,919.26. That includes $146 million for decontamination and construction costs and $29 million for operation and maintenance over five years, Jean-François Parenteau, the executive-committee member responsible for sustainable development, said last week.

The Council vote for the project was 35 for and 21 against. The main opposition to the project was from the Association of Suburban Municipalities. Councillors representing the Association said island suburbs were not given sufficient information to make an informed decision on the plant, even though they will be responsible for nearly $30 million of its cost.

SUEZ is one of the largest water and waste companies in the world.  In Canada, it  operates and maintains the Edmonton Co-Composting Facility, Edmonton Materials Recovery Facility, and maintains the Edmonton Integrated Processing & Transfer Facility for the City of Edmonton. SUEZ also operates and maintains the Swan Hills Treatment Centre for the Province of Alberta.

According to the Montreal Gazette, the City of Montreal’s City could have the most expensive waste composting operations in all of Canada.  Montreal’s 2019-2021 capital spending program shows that spending on the waste organics program is estimated to be $589 million.

In the summer, a whistleblower that alerted the media of the high cost of Montreal’s waste organics program called it the “most expensive composting plants in this universe.”

If all goes as planned, the new composting plant should be up and running by September 2021.

Cost of Composting in Montreal Skyrockets

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According to the Montreal Gazette, the City of Montreal’s City could have the most expensive waste composting operations in all of Canada.  Montreal’s 2019-2021 capital spending program shows that spending on the waste organics program is estimated to be $589 million.

In the summer, a whistleblower that alerted the media of the high cost of Montreal’s waste organics program called it the “most expensive composting plants in this universe.”

The latest figure is up by 70 per cent over last year’s estimate of $344 million, though no shovel has yet gone into the ground. The project is also now more than double the initial price tag of $237.5 million that was announced in 2013.

The key changes between the new 2019-2021 capital works program and the 2018-2020 program are as follows:

  • St-Laurent composting plant: cost goes from $65.3 million in previous program to $131.9 million in new program. Delayed from December 2020 to August 2021.
  • Montreal-East biomethanation plant: goes from $72.8 million to $126.4 million in new program. Delayed from December 2020 to August 2021.
  • R.D.P.–Pointe-aux-Trembles composting plant: goes from $46.9 million in previous program to $90.7 million in new program. Delayed from December 2020 to June 2024.
  • LaSalle biomethanation plant: goes from $89.1 million in previous program to $143 million in new program. Delayed from June 2024 to June 2025.
  • Montreal-East pre-treatment plant: goes from $22.2 million to $31.1 million in new program. Delayed from December 2021 to September 2024.

The cost increase is the result of high bids on contracts to design, build, operate and maintain the first three of the five centres, the city executive committee member responsible for the project, Jean-François Parenteau, said on Thursday.

The city received a single bid in two of the calls for tenders, and two bids in the third.  La compagnie de recyclage de papiers MD and SUEZ Canada Waste Services were each the sole bidder on, respectively, a composting plant in Rivière-des-Prairies—Pointe-aux-Trembles borough and a biomethanation plant in the suburb of Montreal-East.

La compagnie de recyclage de papiers MD is a Quebec based company that has been in operation since 1991.  In 2017, it won a contract to design, build, operate and ensure the maintenance of a new recyclable materials sorting centre in the Montreal borough of Lachine.

SUEZ is one of the largest water and waste companies in the world.  In Canada, it  operates and maintains the Edmonton Co-Composting Facility, Edmonton Materials Recovery Facility, and maintains the Edmonton Integrated Processing & Transfer Facility for the City of Edmonton. SUEZ also operates and maintains the Swan Hills Treatment Centre for the Province of Alberta.

The two companies were the only competitors for a composting centre in St-Laurent borough.

 

Farm Boy Grocery to test on-site organic treatment system

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Farm Boy Grocery is partnering with Food Cycle Science on a project that will test an on-site organic food waste mechanical/drying system.  As a way to extract lost value from waste, this project will show how a small footprint, on-site system can process organic food waste at grocery retailers to reduce handling, storage and transportation costs – while producing an end-product with beneficial nutrient and fertilizer properties.

Food Cycle Science is an Ottawa-based clean-tech start-up company that was incorporated in 2011.  It claims that its FoodCycler unit is capable of reducing food scraps by 90%, while converting the remaining 10% in a soil amendment.  It also claims that its system is odorless, silent, and energy efficient.

When in operation, the enclosed system first agitates the food waste, breaking it down into small particles.  While it is being agitated, it is also heated, partially decomposing and sterilizing the by-product entirely. The carbon filter filtration system on the unit is used for odour control.  The FoodCycler process takes anywhere from 2-6 hours for the process to completely dehydrate the food waste.

The form of the by-product that is generated from the process varies depending on the type of food waste being processed. Fish or cooked vegetables appear as fine powder form, and uncooked vegetables appear in a small cereal-like form. Cake, rice, and starches will have a thicker, chunkier texture.

Home-size Food Cycle Unit

The St. Lawrence River Institute of Environmental Sciences undertook an initial characterization of the physical, chemical and biological properties of the organic material produced by the FoodCycler unit located at the Cornwall Community Hospital. The preliminary results indicated that the FoodCycler material met most of the requirements for metals, pathogens and maturity for AA compost in Ontario.

Partial funding for the project is provided through the BLOOM Centre’s Clean Technology Demonstration Program.  Under Bloom Centre program, demonstrations consist of unique collaborative projects involving both a cleantech solution provider and an end-use customer ‘host’ who is representative of the broader sector. In addition, each project includes other strategic partners to support the roll-out and market adoption of the low-carbon cleantech solution following completion of the demonstration.

The outcomes and results of the demonstration project will be used to:

  • Inform stakeholders in the food supply industry that viable cleantech and low carbon solutions are commercially available;
  • Reduce the perceived environmental, economic, and business risks of adopting cleantech solutions;
  • Bridge the ‘adoption gap’ and increase the market demand for cleantech solutions; and
  • Quantify the economic, GHG emission reduction and other environmental and societal benefits from the widespread adoption of cleantech solutions in Ontario.

This is not the first foray into food recycling by Farm Boy Grocery.  In 2017, the company partnered with a company that developed a mobile app, Flashfood, meant to help tackle the enormous environmental issue of food waste, while offering discerning consumers savings on products they would purchase anyway.  It’s the first and only app focused on reducing that food waste by partnering with grocers to sell surplus items at reduced prices.

The Flashfood app allows for grocery stores to post their high-quality, surplus grocery items like prepared meals, breads and dairy before they end up as food waste. As they near their best-before date, Flashfood lists the products at lower prices for them to be purchased instead of thrown out to landfills. Savvy shoppers can buy items through the app and pick them up in store at great prices.

The Farm Boy demonstration project is scheduled to be completed by March 31, 2019.

 

B.C. Proposes Changes to Organic Matter Recycling Regulation

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The British Columbia Ministry of  Environment and Climate Change Strategy (the “Ministry”)  recently introduced proposed changes to the Organic Matter Recycling Regulation (OMRR).  The Regulation itself governs the construction and operation of compost facilities, and the production, distribution, storage, sale and use of biosolids and compost. It provides clear guidance for local governments and compost and biosolids producers, on how to use organic material while protecting soil quality and drinking water sources.

The Ministry is currently conducting a comprehensive the OMMR to ensure it remains protective of human health and the environment. The Ministry recently published a 2018 Intentions Paper for review. The Intentions Paper is the result of policy development following
three previous policy intentions papers (October 2006, July 2012, and September 2016) with consultations, a follow up Summary of
Public Input and Policy Update (March 2017), and policy work completed this past year by the Ministry.

The policy intentions paper presents the Ministry’s policy intentions for proposed revisions to the OMRR. The policy intentions paper reflects details and further policy development completed since March 2017, including in topic areas that had been identified for further exploration or policy development in the Summary of Public Input and Policy Update.  The policy intentions paper is developed for the purpose of consultation.

The ministry’s proposed revisions to the OMRR are intended to address advances in science, feedback from stakeholders, policy direction, and operational issues or gaps that have been identified through implementation of the OMRR. Proposed OMRR revisions will be in keeping with the ministry’s approach to develop legislation, regulation and policies based on evidence and sound scientific knowledge and expertise.

Vancouver Compost Site

The Intentions Paper contains specific policy intentions and details that have changed since earlier consultations or are new policy proposals which were not discussed in previous intentions papers.  They are are follows:

  • Improving government authority with a shift from a notification process to a registration process (Section 1);
  • Classifying composting facility size by the amount of feedstock received (i.e., input) rather than the amount of
    compost produced (i.e., output) (Section 1);
  • Requiring that a notice of operation be given by facilities producing BGM and using more than 5 m3 of biosolids at a
    site per calendar year (Section 1.1);
  • Specifying requirements for engagement with First Nations (Section 2);
  • Enabling substitutions (Section 3);
  • Enabling fee payments for substitutions and registrations (Section 4);
  • Addition of new feedstocks for composting, including raw domestic sludge and used mushroom growing substrate
    and (Section 5);
  • Establishing timelines for composting facilities under permit, approval or operational certificate to adopt higher
    performance standards (Section 6.2);
  • Improving standards for compost quality criteria, including a new limit of 0.25 percent by wet weight for plastics
    (Section 6.3);
  • Specifying mandatory setbacks for composting operations (Section 6.4); and
  • Enabling a director to request post-application sampling for each site and occurrence of the land application of
    managed organic matter (Section 7.4).

The Ministry is encouraging comments regarding the information outlined in the 2018 Intentions Paper. The deadline for responses is November 8, 2018.  The Ministry has stated that it will consider all responses as it prepares the proposed revisions to the regulation.