Ontario Government to grant Municipalities the right to landfill Approvals

The Ontario Government recently introduced legislation that will provide municipal governments with the right to approve new landfill projects. When the legislative process is complete, impacted communities will have a final say on whether a proposed project can move forward. The legislation provides that municipalities within 3.5km of a proposed landfill site – whether a host municipality, or a neighbouring municipality – will have the right to approve or reject these projects.

The Demand the Right Coalition of Ontario Municipalities (www.demandtheright.ca) has championed the need for municipalities to have approval rights over landfill projects beginning with the  in 2017. Since that time, the Coalition has grown to over 148 municipalities across Ontario including both urban and rural communities.

The legislation proposes amendments to Ontario’s Environment Assessment legislation. Once passed, the legislation will affect any new landfill project that has not already received the approval of the Ministry of Environment, Conservation, and Parks (MOECP).

“We fought hard to have adjacent municipalities included in the approval process,” said Mayor Ted Comiskey, Chair of the province-wide group, and Mayor of Ingersoll.  Comiskey. “This is very important, as the new landfill proposals can have just as much or more impact on an adjacent community as the host community.”

Comiskey said, “All the members of our coalition are anxious to see the legislative process completed as soon as possible. Once set into law, private waste management companies will finally have to respect the wishes of local communities.”

“This does not mean the end of new landfills in Ontario,” Comiskey said. “The legislation creates an even playing field for municipalities and the waste management companies that may want to develop a landfill in or near that community’s jurisdiction.”

Peter Hargreave, President of Policy Ingretity Inc., stated in a LinkedIn post, that the new legislation will mean less landfills and greater recycling, more Energy-from-Waste, or more trucks heading to the landfills in the United States.

Quebec Government commits to Province-wide composting by 2025

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The Quebec government recently announced that is was putting $1.2 billion towards a composting strategy that will result in all citizens in the province having  access to composting services come 2025 and with the fully implemented by 2030.  In addition to providing composting services to citizens across the province, the plan is to manage composting in all industries, businesses and institutions by 2025 as well, in the goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 270,000 tonnes per year by 2030.

“We are taking another step forward by investing $1.2 billion to divert organic matter from disposal sites and ensure their recovery, which will significantly contribute to reducing our greenhouse gas emissions,” Benoit Charette, Quebec Environment Minister said in a statement. “Thanks to the support of the government and the municipalities, the entire population as well as industries, businesses and institutions will be able to contribute to an even healthier management of our residual materials.”

Currently, only 57 per cent of Quebecers have access to food waste collection services. The province’s waste totals in at 5.8 million tons per year, 60 per cent of which is organic matter. The waste sector also emits around 4.55 million tonnes of CO2 equivalent per year and is the fifth largest contributor in the province.

The new strategy aims to adapt collection services as well as processing facilities to Quebec’s many regions. To promote composting and limit waste, the government is increasing landfill charges from $23.51 to $30 per ton.  Charette said this sends a clear signal that Quebec intends to discourage the elimination of residual materials in favour of their recovery.

The government claims that for this strategy to work, all actors, including those at the municipal level, must share responsibilities – and it says it plans on helping them better manage their green waste and improving their ecocentres to do so. Quebec will work with municipalities to speed up the establishment of collection services and processing facilities. In addition, the province will promote the quality of the organic matter treated and the development of local outlets for composts and other residual fertilizing materials from this collection.

The program to reduce, recover and recycle organic materials from industries, businesses and institutions, administered by Recyc-Québec, will be awarded $9.6 million. The Crown corporation is also responsible for a new recognition program for sorting centres for construction, renovation and demolition residue. That program is the result of concerted discussions with the residual materials management industry.

In summary, the goals of Quebec’s compost strategy are as follows:

  • Offer the collection of organic matter to all citizens of Quebec by 2025.
  • Manage organic matter in 100 per cent of industries, businesses and institutions by 2025.
  • Recycle or recover 70 per cent of the organic matter targeted by 2030.
  • Reduce 270,000 tonnes of CO2 equivalent per year in greenhouse gas emissions by 2030.

The plan also intends to allocate funds to programs that finance the management of organic matter, which will help boost green infrastructures. The government says this will help boost the province’s economic recovery.

 

Australian Government to directly invest $190 million on a Waste & Recycling Plan to Transform the Industry

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The Australian Government recently announced that it will commit $190 million to a new Recycling Modernisation Fund (RMF) that will generate $600 million of recycling investment and drive a billion-dollar transformation of Australia’s waste and recycling capacity.

The government claims that more than 10,000 jobs will be created and over 10 million tonnes of waste diverted from landfill to the making of useful products as Australia turbo charges its recycling capacity.

The RMF will support innovative investment in new infrastructure to sort, process and remanufacture materials such as mixed plastic, paper, tyres and glass, with Commonwealth funding contingent on co-funding from industry, states and territories.

Australia’s waste and recycling transformation is being further strengthened by an additional:

  • $35 million to implement Commonwealth commitments under Australia’s National Waste Policy Action Plan, which sets the direction for waste management and recycling in Australia until 2030.
  • $24.6 million on Commonwealth commitments to improve our national waste data so it can measure recycling outcomes and track progress against our national waste targets.
  • The introduction of new Commonwealth waste legislation to formally enact the Government’s waste export ban and encourage companies to take greater responsibility for the waste they generate, from product design through to recycling, remanufacture or disposal (Product Stewardship).

The moves are part of a national strategy to change the way Australia looks at waste, grow the economy, protect the environment and reach a national resource recovery target of 80% by 2030.

“As we cease shipping our waste overseas, the waste and recycling transformation will reshape our domestic waste industry, driving job creation and putting valuable materials back into the economy,” Minister for the Environment Sussan Ley said in a recent news release.

Susan Ley, Australian Minister of the Environment

“Australians need to have faith that the items they place in their kerbside recycling bins will be re-used in roads, carpet, building materials and a range of other essential items.

“At the same time, we need to stop throwing away tonnes of electronic waste and batteries each year and develop new ways to recycle valuable resources.

“As we pursue National Waste Policy Action Plan targets, we need manufacturers and industry to take a genuine stewardship role that helps create a sustainable circular economy.

“This is a once in a generation opportunity to remodel waste management, reduce pressure on our environment and create economic opportunity.”

Assistant Minister for Waste Reduction and Environmental Management, Trevor Evans, said that the unparalleled expansion of Australia’s recycling capacity followed close consultation with industry.

“Our targeted investment will grow Australia’s circular economy, create more jobs and build a stronger onshore recycling industry,” Assistant Minister Evans said.

“Australian companies are turning plastics and household waste into furniture, decking, fencing and clothing, and we are developing new domestic markets for recycled materials by setting national standards for recycled content in roads and making recycled products a focus of procurement for infrastructure, defence estate management and general government purchasing.

“Our targeted investment will grow Australia’s circular economy, create more jobs and build a stronger onshore recycling industry.

“Companies are already moving with The Pact Group announcing a $500 million investment in facilities, research and technology, Coca-Cola Amatil committing to new recycling targets, and Pact, Cleanaway and Asahi Beverages establishing a $30 million recycling facility in Albury.”

Waste export ban to start from January 2021

The unparalleled expansion of Australia’s recycling capacity follows the 2019 National Waste Policy Action Plan, Australia’s government ban on exports of waste plastic, paper, glass and tyres, and this year’s first ever National Plastics Summit.

The waste export ban was due to commence on July 1st, 2020. After consulting with industry and as a result of restrictions related to COVID-19 impacting Parliament’s ability to pass legislation in by July 1st, the ban will now commence on January 1st, 2021. The schedule for implementing the export ban on waste plastic, paper and tyres remains unchanged.

 

 

Ontario’s Durham Region Moving ahead with Anaerobic Digester Facility

The Region of Durham Council, elected offiicals that represent the municipality located immediately east of Toronto, recently agreed to continue the negotiation of a joint venture/co-ownership agreement with Epcor Utilities for the development of the Anaerobic Digestion plant for source separate organics.

The mixed waste pre-sort AD facility with an energy-from-waste plant will be a first-of-its-kind fully integrated waste management initiative in North America, according to the council. The system will convert food scraps into renewable natural gas and will use residuals to generate electrical energy that can be used in various applications.

The proposed AD process will be ‘odour and emissions-free’, according to the council, thanks to a facility with negative pressure and the use of bio-filters.

“This is an exciting project for Durham Region, said John Henry, regional chair and CEO. “AD has many environmental benefits that contribute to Durham’s climate change mitigation initiatives and allows us to continue to treat waste as a resource to generate energy.

“The mixed waste pre-sort facility will increase our diversion rates by capturing items that should not have been placed in the garbage, while at the same time processing food scraps into energy and fertiliser products. It’s an initiative that continues to solidify our position as an environmental leader.”

The new facility will be located next to the Durham York Energy Centre (DYEC) in the Energy Park. It will incorporate sustainable development principles and complement the current architectural design and landscaping of the park. Traffic into the DYEC will only increase by two waste delivery trucks when the plant is operational.

According to Durham Region, the facility will delay the need to expand the DYEC facility. The organisation said the local population is growing and expected to reach more than one million people in the next 10 years, meaning more waste will be created.

Susan Siopis, commissioner of works, added: “This will be a one-of-a-kind facility, combining AD on-site with mixed waste pre-sorting, and will highlight the environmental leadership underway in Durham Region as we become the first in North America to build a facility like this.

“The pre-sort facility will not replace or eliminate the current Green Bin programme, instead, it will complement it by capturing from the garbage any organics the green bin did not capture.”

GFL Environmental Announces US$835 million Acquisition of Assets and Expansion of U.S. Footprint

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GFL Environmental Inc. (NYSE andTSX: GFL) (“GFL” or the “Company”), a Canadian-headquartered environmental services company, recently announced that it has entered into a definitive agreement to purchase a portfolio of vertically integrated solid waste collection, transfer, recycling and disposal assets (the “Acquisition”) for an aggregate purchase price of US$835 million.

The assets to be acquired by the Company, which include 32 collection operations, 36 transfer stations and 18 landfills supported by 380 collection vehicles across 10 U.S. states, represent substantially all of the divestiture assets expected to result from the previously announced acquisition of Advanced Disposal Services, Inc. (“ADS”) by a wholly owned subsidiary of Waste Management, Inc. (“WM” and such transaction, the “WM-ADS Transaction”). The acquired assets are expected to generate annualized revenue of approximately US$345 million.

Strategic Benefits of the Acquisition

The acquired assets are expected to support GFL’s continued organic growth extending its reach into new and adjacent markets and forming a base to pursue synergistic tuck-in acquisitions. GFL expects that the Acquisition will significantly expand its U.S. footprint while creating an opportunity to realize meaningful synergies and earnings accretion. The Acquisition is expected to:

  • Expand GFL’s Geographical Reach. The Acquisition provides GFL with an attractive opportunity to extend its geographical reach into the U.S. Midwest, through a network of vertically integrated assets with a strong regional market presence in the State of Wisconsin.
  • Provide a Complementary Asset Network. The Acquisition brings a high-quality, complementary asset network and customer base to GFL’s existing operations in the States of MichiganGeorgiaAlabama and Pennsylvania.
  • Improve Operating Margins. WM and GFL will enter into a reciprocal 5-year disposal arrangement that will provide the Company with competitive, stable and predictable pricing and disposal terms.
  • Create Long Term Shareholder Value. The Acquisition reinforces the Company’s goal of creating long term equity value for shareholders. The high-quality portfolio of acquired assets coupled with the experienced management team joining GFL are expected to be immediately accretive to free cash flow and provide opportunities for the Company to continue to pursue its growth strategy.

“Even during these unprecedented times, we continue to successfully execute on our growth strategy of pursuing strategic and accretive acquisitions.  This transaction presents GFL with a unique opportunity to significantly expand our U.S. footprint through the acquisition of a high quality, vertically integrated set of assets in both our existing and adjacent fast growing U.S. markets,” said Patrick Dovigi, the Founder and Chief Executive Officer of GFL. “We are excited to welcome over 900 employees of WM and ADS to the GFL family and are confident that we will continue to offer excellent customer service to our expanded customer base.”

Timing and Approvals

The Acquisition is subject to certain customary closing conditions, including approval by the U.S. Department of Justice and the closing of the WM-ADS Transaction. The Acquisition is not subject to any financing conditions. Closing is expected to occur in the third quarter of 2020, following the WM-ADS Transaction.

Financing of the Acquisition

GFL is well positioned to fund the Acquisition with its strong balance sheet and proven access to capital markets. The Company currently anticipates funding the Acquisition using a combination of capacity under its revolving credit facility and cash on hand but will evaluate other longer-term strategic and opportunistic financing opportunities as they present themselves.  Following completion of the Acquisition, GFL expects to maintain its current credit rating profile and leverage within previously stated ranges.

Start-up receives $2.75M from SDTC to commercialize the manufacture of bioplastics from agricultural byproducts

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Sustainable Canada Technology Canada (SDTC) recently announced that it had granted $2.75 million to EcoPackers, a Canadian cleantech company that converts agricultural byproducts into 100 percent plant-based and compostable alternatives to traditional plastic inputs.

EcoPackers Leadership Team

Conceived by CEO Nuha Siddiqui during her time as president of the University of Toronto chapter of the social entrepreneurship club Enactus, Ecopackers is on a mission to reduce the world’s reliance on single-use plastics.

The Toronto-based company, developed with support from the Creative Destruction Lab, got its start manufacturing biodegradable packing peanuts made from agricultural byproducts. It has since expanded into producing eco-resins that can be used by manufacturers in place of plastic.

Unlike many existing bioplastics, Ecopackers’ resin is designed to be compatible with existing manufacturing technologies and processes.

“We were one of the only eco-focused companies out there that wasn’t going against the plastic manufacturers – we were actually trying to work with them to develop products that worked with their technology,” Siddiqui, a Rotman Commerce graduate, told U of T News.

The all-woman leadership team behind Ecopackers – which also includes chief technology officer Chang Dong and chief operating officer Kritika Tyagi – is now working on pilot products with manufacturers around the world.

About SDTC

Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC) is a foundation created by the Government of Canada to support Canadian companies with the potential to become world leaders in their efforts to develop and demonstrate new environmental technologies that address climate change, clean air, clean water and clean soil.

 

Environmental Regulatory Compliance in B.C., Alberta, Ontario and Quebec During COVID-19

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Written by Sabrina Spencer, Dufferin Harper, Jonathan W. Kahn, Charles Kazaz, and Sydney McLauchlan, Blake Cassels & Graydon LLP

In light of ongoing uncertainty of the duration of COVID-19 and its impact on industrial operations and despite the federal government only committing to the exercise of “enforcement discretion,” several provinces have recently acted to temporarily relax numerous environmental notice, reporting and compliance requirements. This bulletin provides an update on the changes introduced over the past several weeks by the governments of Alberta, British Columbia, Ontario and Quebec. For initial governmental actions pertaining to environmental regulatory compliance requirements during the current COVID-19 pandemic, and measures businesses can take to protect themselves, please refer to our March 2020 Blakes Bulletin: Environmental Regulatory Compliance During the COVID-19 Pandemic.

BRITISH COLUMBIA

The Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy (MOE) has issued a notice stating that authorization requirements under the Environmental Management Act (EMA) and the Integrated Pest Management Act (IPMA) remain in effect and all reasonable measures should be taken to comply. If an authorization holder is unable to meet its requirements due to the impact of orders, directives or guidance issued by B.C. in response to COVID-19, the MOE requires notice of the non-compliance, including a rationale as to how the compliance issue is related to COVID-19 and information on mitigative measures being taken. Notice regarding non-compliance pursuant to the EMA must be provided to [email protected], while notice regarding non-compliance pursuant to the IPMA must be provided to [email protected]. The MOE will take into consideration directives and guidance from the public health officer when addressing non-compliances.

On March 27, 2020, the Chief Gold Commissioner issued a blanket order extending timelines in relation to all claims and licenses under the Mineral Tenure Act, as well as in relation to all coal licenses and leases under the Coal Act. The time to make cash in lieu or register work on claims that have expiry dates before December 31, 2021, is extended to December 31, 2021. Claims with expiry dates past this date are not subject to this order. For mining and placer leases, as well as coal leases and licenses, the time to register the annual rental payment, which is normally on the anniversary date, is extended to December 31, 2021.

Also on March 27, 2020, a notice was issued jointly by the Environmental Appeal Board, the Forest Appeals Tribunal and the Oil and Gas Appeal Tribunal suspending mandatory timeframes, effective March 18, 2020, for the filing of appeals at all three tribunals. The suspension of timeframes will remain in effect until further notice at the end of the COVID-19 public health crisis.

On April 1, 2020, OIC 158/2020 was approved to amend regulations made pursuant to the Greenhouse Gas Industrial Reporting and Control Act. OIC 158/2020 gives the director discretion to accept incomplete emission reports or compliance reports (i.e. either missing required information or a verification statement) for the reporting period ending December 31, 2019 (2019 GHG Reporting), and to provide up to six months for the missing information to be provided. The OIC also gives the director discretion to extend the submission deadline for 2019 GHG Reporting by up to six months. Finally, the OIC gives the director discretion to conduct any site visit required in relation to 2019 GHG Reporting virtually and in accordance with the director’s directions. Details on how this discretion will be exercised have not been provided.

On April 8, 2020, the Oil and Gas Commission (OGC) issued Industry Bulletin 2020-09, extending the payment deadline for the 2019/20 pipeline annual levy from 30 to 90 days. The OGC has also indicated that it will continue to undertake proactive inspections, with modified procedures to maintain social distancing which may include requesting site photographs from company representatives in lieu of site visits where possible. The OGC will also continue to take enforcement action where necessary. The OGC has also provided direction in relation to its modified operations, including new procedures related to core samples and drill cuttings, in its COVID-19 Response for Industry bulletin, which will be updated as operations continue to evolve in response to COVID-19.

ALBERTA

On March 30, 2020, the Minister of Environment and Parks, issued Order 15/2020 and Order 16/2020, which relaxed certain reporting requirements under the Technology Innovation and Emissions Reduction (TIER) Regulation and the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS) Regulation, respectively. On March 31, 2020, the Minister issued Order 17/2020, which relaxed requirements under the Environmental Protection and Enhancement Act (EPEA), the Water Act (WA) and the Public Lands Act (PLA). On the same day, the Director of Air Policy issued a temporary amendment to requirements under the Air Monitoring Directive (AMD). On April 6, 2020, the Minister of Energy issued Order 219/2020 which relaxed requirements under the Oil and Gas Conservation Act (OGCA), Coal Conservation Act (CCA) and Oil Sands Conservation Act (OSCA).

Order 15/2020 modifies the TIER Regulation by extending the deadline to submit 2019 compliance reports and emissions reduction plan reports, and Order 16/2020 modifies the RFS Regulation by extending the deadline for fuel suppliers, approved contributors, and renewable fuel providers to submit 2019 compliance reports, both from March 31, 2020, to June 30, 2020.

Order 17/2020 modifies the EPEA suspending all requirements to report information pursuant to provisions in approvals or registrations issued under EPEA. Similarly, reporting entities are no longer required to report information relating to provisions in licenses or approvals issued under the WA. Finally, all disposition requirements to submit returns or reports are suspended under the PLA. Drinking water facilities are not captured by these amendments however and must continue to follow all terms and conditions of the authorizations, including the required reporting.

Order 219/2020 modifies the CCA and the OSCA by suspending various reporting requirements, including annual reporting, exploration reporting and all plans within approval conditions, except conditions related to geotechnical reporting requirements. It also modifies the OGCA by suspending various reporting requirements. All initial suspension requirements for inactive wells that are not part of the Well Compliance Program and considered low and medium-risk type 6 are suspended, in addition to ongoing inspection requirements. For inactive wells in the Well Compliance program, the compliance deadline is suspended for the final program year.

The relaxation to requirements set out in Orders 15, 16, 17 and 219/2020 are in effect until August 14, 2020, or 60 days after the Order in Council 080/2020 is terminated (if done so before June 15, 2020), or when terminated by the Lieutenant Governor in Council, or by the Minister.

In addition, from March 31, 2020, to December 31, 2020, several AMD reporting requirements are relaxed including: reduced frequency of ambient continuous air monitoring station calibrations, station manifold and inlet cleaning; removal to report “calendar day” in AMD reporting forms; three-month extension for completion and submission of 2019 Annual Emissions Inventory Report; removal to immediately report exceedances of Ambient Air Quality Guidelines until August 31, 2020; and two-month extension for submission of airshed monthly air monitoring summary reports and ambient data.

ONTARIO

The Government of Ontario has promised guidance relating to requirements for monitoring and reporting during the COVID-19 crisis, but thus far no guidance has been provided and all monitoring and reporting obligations under regulations and approvals remain in force. Operationally, anecdotal experience suggests that some Ministry of Environment, Conservation and Parks offices are showing flexibility from an enforcement perspective, but this appears to be largely an ad hoc approach in situations where compliance is not achievable.

The Ministry of Environment, Conservation and Parks has announced that it is temporarily exempting all Ontario Ministries from the requirement to post proposals for instruments on the Environmental Registry, ostensibly to allow the Government to respond quickly to time sensitive needs of the Government and various regulated entities.

As set out in previous Blakes bulletins, the Ontario courts have suspended various civil proceedings and the Government of Ontario has suspended limitation periods and various procedural time limits. The Ontario Environmental Review Tribunal has confirmed that all in-person Environmental Review Tribunal hearings will be postponed but it is where possible carrying on with interlocutory and procedural matters by teleconference.

QUEBEC

The Quebec Ministry of the Environment and Fight against Climate Change (MELCC) has issued guidance on its website regarding compliance inspection activities during the COVID-19 state of emergency. The MELCC has indicated that it will need to adjust its delivery of compliance services to be consistent with the government position on COVID-19 that is focused on social distancing and take into account the challenges faced by businesses.

Under the MELCC guidance, businesses must do everything they can to avoid causing damage to the environment and they must continue to comply with legal obligations for situations that may have a direct impact on the health and safety of the population as well as on the quality of the environment.

Compliance inspections by the MELCC, other than those related to responding to environmental emergencies, responding to complaints and monitoring of drinking water, will be limited and performed in situations where there is a significant risk to the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the population.

The MELCC has also indicated that it will be tolerant with businesses whose ability to comply with environmental obligations are affected by the restrictions put in place as a result of the COVID-19 emergency measures, particularly in relation to compliance with administrative requirements, such as requirement to transmit reports. In the majority of non-compliance situations, enforcement measures will not be used. However, the MELCC reserves the right to do so if the situation requires action. Specifically, enforcement measures, such as notices of non-compliance and administrative monetary penalties, will be limited and adapted to the current COVID-19 situation. If situations of non-compliance cause significant risks to the environment or to the health and safety of the population, the government will assess the action to be taken, taking into account the emergency situation and the context specific to each case.

The MELCC has also announced that it will temporarily exempt companies who seek to convert their operations in order to participate in efforts to combat COVID-19 from obtaining environmental authorization that would normally be required to modify an activity—for example, an increase in production—or to add an activity—for example, the design of new products. The MELCC must be notified of the activity to undertaken and receive confirmation of the exemption from the Minister, which will be delivered with 48 hours.

SUMMARY

The impact of COVID-19 is rapidly evolving and there are no clear answers or timeframe for the crisis to end. To help navigate the challenges, Blakes has consolidated resources on a range of topics relating to COIVD-19 and its business and legal implications.

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About the Authors

Sabrina Spencer is an Associate at Blakes’ Vancouver offices.  Sabrina’s practice focuses on environmental, indigenous and municipal law, and includes project development matters, real property matters, regulatory compliance, indigenous consultation and accommodation, and commercial transactions and agreements.

Dufferin Harper (Duff) is a Partner at Blakes’ Calgary offices.  He practices in the areas of environmental law, commercial litigation and regulatory law. He routinely acts for clients on environmental due diligence and liability issues, especially as they pertain to brownfield redevelopment and transportation of dangerous goods.

Jonathan W. Kahn is a Partner at Blakes’ Toronto offices.  He is widely regarded as one of Canada’s leading environmental lawyers. For more than 25 years, he has provided representation and advice on a broad range of environmental and natural resources law issues.

Charles Kazaz practices all aspects of environmental law at Blakes. He advises clients in the commercial, industrial, mining and waste-management sectors. Charles is based in both Montréal and Toronto and has extensive expertise in environmental aspects of corporate, commercial and property transactions, project development, regulatory compliance and liability issues.

Sydney McLauchlan is an articling student at Blakes. She obtained her J.D. from Queen’s University Belfast.

 

 

Free Webinar on True Zero Waste and the Circular Economy

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This webinar is a complimentary event open to the United States Green Building Coalition – Los Angeles (USGBC-LA) community members and the general public.  It is scheduled for May 13th at 11 am Pacific Daylight Time.

Topics of discussion on the TRUE Zero Waste and Circular Economy Overview – Webinar on May 13th (11 am PDT) include:

  • What is Circular Economy?
  • What’s the difference between Circular Economy and a really good recycling program?
  • Introduction to the basic concepts:
    • Waste = Food
    • Build Resilience Through Diversity
    • Energy from Renewable Resources
    • Think in Systems
    • True Zero Waste Certification overview

Without urgent action, global waste will increase by 70 percent on current levels by 2050, according to the World Bank’s new report. The make-take-waste way of doing things is coming to an end and if we do it right, we’ll create massive new economical and social opportunities!

During the webinar there will be a discussion on how businesses can create value by striving for zero waste, seeing products and materials as cycles, the role of creative solutions, and how you can contribute to make the transition to a Circular Economy.

SPEAKERS

 Denise Braun, CEO All About Waste

Denise has over seventeen years of experience in the sustainability field, starting in Brazil and then moving to the United States. She is the founder and principal of All About Waste – a woman and minority-owned sustainability and zero waste consulting firm based in Los Angeles, CA. Denise and her team provide a diverse range of services including solid waste data collection and analysis, circular strategic frameworks, green building certifications, zero waste programs and certification, training/educational workshops, and community outreach. She has worked in various capacities on over 150 LEED-certified projects, many of which have achieved the highest level of certification with no clarifications. Denise is currently working on several zero-waste and wellness projects. She worked on the first TRUE-certified zero waste high-rise commercial building in the world. Denise has been responsible for over 30 million square feet of waste audits and has developed and analyzed technical waste management solutions for a large variety of building types. Denise has presented at numerous lectures, workshops, and conferences, including the annual Municipal Green Building Conference and Expo, Net Zero Conference, the Living Building Collaborative Zero Waste Forum and the GreenBuild Conference & Expo. She currently has several accreditation and expertise such as: LEED AP,  WELL AP, ENV SP, TRUE Advisor, Fitwel Ambassador and sustainable supply chain. She also is sitting as a Board of Director at USGBC-LA.

 Ryan McMullan, CEO Lean Green Way

Over his career Ryan McMullan has led several Sustainability programs including in Toyota’s Corporate Responsibility department and Rice University’s Facilities & Engineering department.  These have included strategically developing and deploying environmental targets across a wide variety of functional groups, reporting on environmental progress, greenhouse gas inventories, and developing programs for zero waste, zero carbon, and zero water.  He now consults with companies like Lockheed-Martin, Walmart and Mattress Recycling Council (MRC) to help them establish leading sustainability strategies. He is an advisor to TRUE Zero Waste Certification at GBCI and the Environmental Leader Conference. He earned his Masters from the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at UC Santa Barbara and his Bachelor’s from Rice University.  At home he keeps busy improving the sustainability of his home in Long Beach, California, teaching his 10-year-old son to conserve resources and design games, and writing on his experiences.

British Columbia Landfill to convert LFG to RNG and sell it to FortisBC

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The Capital Regional District (CRD) recently  announced approval in principle of an agreement where FortisBC will purchase Renewable Natural Gas (RNG) produced from the landfill gas (LFG) that is generated from the Hartland Landfill.  The RNG will be used by FortisBC for beneficial use in its natural gas distribution system.

The CRD is a regional government for 13 municipalities and three electoral areas on southern Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands, serving more than 413,000 people. FortisBC Energy Inc. owns and operates approximately 49,000 kilometres of natural gas transmission and distribution pipelines. FortisBC Energy Inc. is a subsidiary of Fortis Inc., a major company in the North American regulated electric and gas utility industry.

The project is expected to reduce the region’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by approximately 264,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent over the 25-year project life, the equivalent of removing 2,240 cars from the road for 25 years. The agreement would allow for FortisBC to purchase between 140,000 gigajoules to 280,000 gigajoules each year for 25 years, starting in late 2021.

“Climate action and environmental stewardship are embedded in the CRD’s strategic priorities, committing the CRD to take a leadership role pursuing carbon neutrality,” said CRD Board Chair Colin Plant. “This Earth Day, we are sharing this significant move forward in our commitment to this goal — working alongside local governments to further reduce emissions and explore new resource recovery opportunities are key initiatives associated with this priority. The GHG analysis clearly points to upgrading landfill gas to Renewable Natural Gas as the best decision for the climate.”

RNG is a carbon-neutral energy made from capturing and upgrading the biogas released from decomposing organic waste in the landfill. RNG blends seamlessly with conventional natural gas in the existing natural gas system to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

“Ongoing commitment towards a lower carbon future remains a key focus at FortisBC,” said Doug Stout, vice-president of market development and external relations with FortisBC. “I’d like to thank the teams at FortisBC and the Capital Regional District for their collaboration in completing this important application and another positive step forward in achieving provincial GHG reductions.”

Increasing the amount of renewable gases in FortisBC’s system is a vital step towards their 30BY30 target, an ambitious goal to reduce customers’ GHG emissions by 30 per cent by 2030.

In 2004, Hartland’s landfill gas-to-electricity plant began using landfill gas for green power generation and currently supplies electricity to approximately 1,600 homes in the region. The volume of biogas being produced at the landfill has exceeded the capacity of this current system, and the existing infrastructure is reaching the end of its useful life. Two options were evaluated: expanding the existing power generation equipment to sell more electricity to BC Hydro or installing a biogas upgrading facility at Hartland Landfill to upgrade this biogas to RNG. This will reduce greenhouse gas emissions through the displacement of conventional natural gas in alignment with the CRD Board’s climate emergency declaration.

A lifecycle greenhouse gas assessment of the two alternatives found that upgrading landfill gas to RNG will reduce the region’s GHG emissions by approximately 264,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent over the 25-year project life, a significant improvement over the electricity scenario, which would result in an approximate 2,800 tonne reduction.

The CRD and FortisBC are currently working together on a supply contract that will be submitted to the British Columbia Utilities Commission for approval. If approved by the commission, the CRD will continue to be responsible for the ownership and operation of the Hartland Landfill, the landfill gas collection system and the upgrade facility. FortisBC will pay a fixed price per gigajoule for the RNG and will be responsible for the costs associated with injecting the RNG in to the natural gas distribution system.

 

Global Smart Waste Management Market valued at at $1.5 Billion

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According to a recent market research report prepared by Maximize Market Research, the global smart waste management market was valued at US$ 1.5 Billion in 2019 and is expected to reach approximately US$ 9.53 Billion by 2027, at compound annual growth rate of 26% during forecast period of 2020 to 2027.

The global smart waste management market is segmented into Waste Type, Solution, Service, Applications and Regions. Based on Waste Type Market is segmented into Industrial Waste and Residential Waste. Based on the solution, the smart waste management market is segmented into network management, analytics and reporting solutions, optimization solutions, asset management, asset management, fleet management, remote monitoring and others. On the basis of service, the global market is bifurcated into managed services and professional services. On the basis of application, the market is divided into food & retail, manufacturing & industrial, municipalities, construction, healthcare, and colleges & universities.

Not only for smart cities or urban areas but smart waste management needed in the rural areas of a country as well. As wastes create problem to the environment and can harm to the humans as well as animals on planet by spreading any kind of diseases and allergies. Wrong methods of waste disposal and landfills also cause environmental hazards and health issues, hence it has become need of the current and forecasted era to look out for so

me smart ways to dispose of the waste. If waste management has done in a good way, it may act as a renewable resource. The companies that offer smart solutions for waste collection primarily focus on three solutions intelligent monitoring, route optimization, and analytics.

The rising volume of waste is creating complexities in the logistics of waste collection and need to meet the several regulations by government and environmental authorities relating to waste processing, urges for the better waste management solutions, which can be made possible by the use of advanced technologies, such as IoT sensors, RFID, GPS, etc. Owing to the several reasons, the smart waste management market is at an emerging phase, and it is estimated to witness healthy growth of CAGR 26% during forecast period 2020-2027.

The report encompasses the market by different segments and region, providing an in-depth analysis of the overall industry ecosystem, useful for making an informed strategic decision by the key stakeholders in the industry. Importantly, the report delivers forecasts and share of the market, further giving an insight into the market dynamics, and future opportunities that might exist in the Global Smart Waste Management Market. The driving forces, as well as considerable restraints, have been explained in depth. In addition to this, competitive landscape describing the strategic growth of the competitors have been taken into consideration for enhancing market know-how of our clients and at the same time explain Global Smart Waste Management Market positioning of competitors.