Edmonton Composting Company fined by City over Odour Issues

An Edmonton composting company, which has operated under an environmental enforcement order since 2011 and been identified in hundreds of public complaints, has agreed to pay $3,500 worth of nuisance odour tickets. CleanIt GreenIt, based in west Edmonton, said it struck a plea bargain with the Crown to pay the fine equivalent of 14 of 33 city bylaw violations ($250 per fine) and avoid court proceedings.

CleanIt GreenIt claims that they are not the sole source of odour in the vicinity.  It claims that sewers, wells and construction sites also periodically emit foul odours.  CleanIt GreenIt is calling for a review of the city’s odour nuisance bylaw, claiming the tickets were issued without scientific facts or proper investigation.  The company states that it was responsible for only 21 of the 149 odour complaints it received in 2020 and investigated.

The company claims that it regularly patrol neighbouring communities and respond rapidly to any reports of smells from its Composting Site. Its patrollers are specially trained to monitor, investigate and report on odour events. It issued a statement defending it position.

Since February 2020, the city said it has received nearly 300 odour complaints about CleanIt GreenIt.  The city said it stopped issuing tickets in February due to the “large amount of bylaw tickets” and COVID-19-related court delays.

Neighbours started a petition to shut the facility down.  It has over 2,000 signatires.

CleanIt GreenIt has been operating at 204 Street and 113 Avenue in Edmonton since November 1998. The city said it has received complaints about the company since 2003.

In 2011, the province issued an enforcement order under the Environmental Protection and Enhancement Act for multiple violations including “failure to contain odours onsite.”  The order also indicates CleanIt GreenIt has been the subject of public complaints since March 2004.

Battery Recycling Program to Launch in Saskatchewan

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The Government of Saskatchewan recently launched a new recycling program for consumer batteries that will provide an option for people in various parts of the province to dispose of their household batteries in an environmentally responsible manner.

Launching January 1, 2021, the program is operated by Call2Recycle Canada Inc., a non-profit environmental stewardship organization that has been voluntarily collecting batteries in Saskatchewan for recycling since 1997.  Call2Recycle met all the regulatory requirements of a government-approved program under The Household Hazardous Waste Products Stewardship Regulations, 2019.

“This recycling program is a positive step for the environment and for the people of Saskatchewan,” Environment Minister Warren Kaeding said.  “Having a convenient and important program in place to keep batteries and other hazardous materials out of our landfills helps support provincial goals laid out in our Solid Waste Management Strategy.”

“I would like to extend my thanks to the Government of Saskatchewan for its commitment to battery recycling in the province,” Call2Recycle Canada, Inc. President Joe Zenobio said.  “Under the new regulation, Call2Recycle’s program will connect residents with many easily accessible and convenient battery drop-off locations across the province.  We encourage all residents to safely drop off their batteries at their nearest collection location to help create a more sustainable environment for generations to come.”

The program accepts used single-use and rechargeable consumer batteries (weighing less than five kilograms each), excluding lead acid batteries.  In partnership with municipalities and retailers, Call2Recycle has established convenient drop-off locations across the province for Saskatchewan residents, including in all SARCAN depots.

“We are excited for SARCAN’s 73 collection depots to be a part of Call2Recycle’s national network of battery collection sites,” SARC and SARCAN Recycling Executive Director Amy McNeil, said.  “Our team of SARCAN recyclers is ready to help the people of Saskatchewan divert even more hazardous materials from our land and waterways, which means protecting our environment for generations to come.”

As part of the new program, an environmental handling fee will be paid at the point of purchase effective January 1, 2021.  The fee rates range, depending on the size of battery and the chemistry type.  For example, fees for AAA and AA batteries are $0.02 and $0.04, respectively.

The fees will be paid to Call2Recycle for the collection, transportation and recycling of the batteries at their end-of-life. For the full fee structure and a map of drop-off locations, please visit https://www.call2recycle.ca/saskatchewan/.

Source: Province of Saskatchewan

Halifax moving ahead with $288 million composting facility

The Halifax Regional Municipality (HRM), Nova Scotia recently awarded Harbour City Resources (HCR), a consortium of companies, with the contract to Design-Build-Own-Operate-Transfer (DBOOT) a composting facility under a Public-Private-Partnership (PPP) with a 25 – 35 year operations and maintenance period.  The new facility will be able to deal with 60,000 tonnes of organic waste a year.

Maple Reinders, headquartered in Ontario, is the managing partner of HCR.  Maple Reinders affiliate company AIM Environmental Group is a partner in HCR and will provide both proprietary technology to the facility as well as the long-term operations and maintenance services.

Since 2014, the municipality has been working towards developing a new organics management facility to process residential green cart materials and commercial organics. As part of the planning steps, the condition of the existing two composting facilities was assessed, a business case for a new facility was developed, and comprehensive public engagement was completed with the findings incorporated into the requirements for the development of a new facility.

HCR’s design for the Halifax composting facility builds on an already established technology and design. Modern features for the proposed facility include:

  • Compost Quality – the compost being produced at the new facility will meet the 2010 NS Environment Composting Facility Guidelines.
  • Odour Control – the proposed facility design incorporates significant measures to mitigate odours, including the use of air lock doors which means that odours from the facility cannot escape to the surrounding community.
  • Energy Efficiency – the proposed facility includes LED lighting and will take advantage of the heat generated from the compost process, and rooftop rainwater collection.
  • Water Negative Process – Unlike the existing composting facilities, this proposed facility is water negative and won’t produce a leachate that will need to be treated off-site.
  • New Use of By-products – Ammonium sulphate, generated from the odour control system, can be marketed as a fertilizer product for the agriculture industry.

Once complete, the new facility will replace two aging facilities and will position HRM well into the future with respect to sustainable management and recycling of organic waste material from residents and commercial producers. The facility incorporates Canada’s most advanced compost screening infrastructure and will create a Class A compost product from the Municipality’s organic waste material. AIM Environmental Group presently operates one of these aging facilities for HRM and will assume management of both facilities during the design, construction, and commissioning phases of the process.

Harbour City Resources has built and operated facilities in Calgary, Hamilton and Guelph, Ontario.

Final contract negotiations and execution are anticipated to be completed in early 2021.  The new facility is anticipated to begin construction in 2021 and will take approximately two to three years to complete.

 

Two Recycling Company CEOs make the Canadian Tech Entrepreneurs Watch List for 2021

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MaRS, a organization that help Canadian start-up companies frown into successful companies, recently released its list of the top 21 Canadian tech entrepreneurs to watch in 2021.  Included in the list are the CEO’s from two recycling companies – GreenMantra and Li-Cycle Corp.

Jodie Morgan, CEO, GreenMantra

Markets have been plagued by uncertainty this year, but cleantech investors can nevertheless rely on the proven practice of recycling materials into sustainable products, so says GreenMantra CEO Jodie Morgan. How fortunate, then, that Morgan and her Brantford company are one of Canada’s top post-consumer, post-industrial plastics recycling firms — morphing one of the most problematic innovations in history into things like asphalt shingles, wax and ink. As a member of MaRS Momentum, GreenMantra is also one of the country’s fastest-growing firms, with sales increasing so rapidly in 2020 that the startup expanded its manufacturing facility and doubled capacity.

What’s next: If “plastic is the new crude oil,” then Morgan and her employees are going to be busy well past next year. GreenMantra is working with petrochemical companies NOVA Chemicals and Inter Pipeline to develop new ways of enhancing asphalt. The positive environmental impact could be huge, particularly when you consider that 1,000 kilometres of paved road, for example, represents up to 2.7 billion plastic bags removed from a landfill.

Ajay Kochhar, CEO and co-founder of Li-Cycle

As climate-focused initiatives become a bigger priority, homegrown companies are looking to contribute in their own unique way. “Canada aims to achieve net-zero carbon emissions by 2050, and clean technology will play a massive role in this transition away from emissions,” says Ajay Kochhar, CEO and co-founder of Li-Cycle. Based in Mississauga, Li-Cycle recovers more than 80 percent of all materials found in lithium-ion batteries through their environmentally sound recycling plants.

What’s next: Having recently announced a Series C equity funding round, the company is looking to expand their services into the U.S. and open a commercial hub in New York.

Basel Amendments Create Uncertainty In Global Plastics And E-Waste Markets

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Written by Jonathan Cocker, Borden Ladner Gervais LLP

After what seemed like a distant obligation in May of 2019, and overshadowed by an increase in plastic usage while managing the virus in 2020, the plastics amendments decision to the Basel Convention will take effect in January 2021 (the Plastic Amendments).

Unfortunately, it seems that the Plastic Amendments provide more questions than answers in how global markets will adjust to these profound changes surrounding end-of-life plastics and products containing plastic – including electronics and other consumer goods.

What do the plastics amendments do?

Under the Plastics Amendments, end-of-life plastic waste, both homogenous and mixed streams, will now be regulated under the Basel Convention (subject to some exemptions) and their transboundary transfer will either be:

  • Prohibited as “hazardous”; or
  • Controlled by domestic regulators through disclosure/Prior Informed Consent (PIC) requirements as “other wastes”.

Gone are the days of unregulated transfers of mixed (often municipal) plastic wastes which became the subject of minor international incidents in the months leading up to the Plastics Amendments. But how do exporters of end-of-life plastics know whether their material is banned, controlled, potentially exempt under the convention, or otherwise not considered a waste at all?

Convention “wastes” include resource recovery materials

As a transboundary waste transfer agreement recognizing “the need as far as possible to reduce such movement to a minimum”, material is deemed a “waste” under the convention when subject to a broad spectrum of treatments – including both various disposal-related activities, as well operations, which may lead to resource recovery, recycling, reclamation, direct re-use or alternative uses”.

Unlike some domestic enabling legislation, the Basel Convention does not have a companion agreement on recyclables so all end-of-life processes are grouped together.  Further, the Plastics Amendments have meant that there are now multiple avenues for many post-consumer products containing plastic to fall under the convention.

Reverse onus to prove not hazardous

Where the material is a waste, the Basel Convention may deem it “hazardous” under broad, inclusive categories by:

  • Direct listing of many conventional waste streams; or
  • Combination of waste:
    • from defined activity or containing (any level) of listed substances; and
    • capture within certain United Nations Dangerous Goods Classes.

There is an ability to rebut the effective presumption that a waste is hazardous but it may be more trouble than it’s worth for exporters managing waste streams of varying composition, including mixed plastics now subject to PIC requirements.  Until recently, a hazardous designation was not fatal to the possible export of such materials to developing world markets for circular economy activities, but this has since changed.

Basel Ban Amendment on hazardous waste recycling in developing world

In September of 2019, Croatia became the 97th signatory to the “Basel Ban Amendment”, thereby entrenching a prohibition against the transfer of hazardous wastes, for whatever purpose, from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)/ European Union (EU) Parties to developing world nations.

In respect of products containing plastic (such as electronics), this may mean very few Basel Convention non-OECD countries will be willing to receive such wastes in potential violation of the convention and transits to such countries through a non-convention country such as the United States are also prohibited.

Other wastes and the exemption test

The majority of post-consumer plastic wastes will likely either fall into the convention’s “other wastes” category – which are subject to controlled mechanisms such as shipment-specific PIC requirements or be exempt from these mechanisms. The exemption test is whether the plastic waste is:

Destined for recycling in an environmentally sound manner and almost free from contamination and other types of wastes

As to the meaning of “almost free of contamination and other types of wastes”, the Plastics Amendments only note cryptically “international and national specifications may offer a point of reference. Unfortunately, the Secretariat has yet to issue relevant guidance, but it would seem that plastics mixed with paper, metals or glass, as well as products containing both plastics and other “waste” materials such as some electronics, would likely be “other wastes” where they are not otherwise hazardous.

Further, only certain specified plastics streams which meet the exemption test will be free from the Basel Convention control mechanisms.

Due diligence required on the importer

Convention compliance is not assured even when an exporter has managed to meet the requirements to establish that the transferring materials are merely “other wastes” and has obtained PIC.  Specifically, the Basel Convention further prohibits the transfer of non-hazardous wastes where the exporter has reason to believe that the wastes will not give “environmentally sound management” (ESM), which is generally:

Taking all practicable steps to ensure that hazardous wastes or other wastes are managed in a manner, which will protect human health and the environment against the adverse effects, which may result from such wastes;

But how is an exporter to recognize ESM or its absence from distant shores? For example, the Agbogbloshie e-waste recycling site in Accra, Ghana is praised by some as model of local opportunity in resource recovery, but has also been plagued by soil contamination issues.

A rise in illegal traffic of international waste

The result of any attempts to skirt the full requirements of the convention as it relates to plastics may draw a determination of “illegal traffic”, which will have both domestic and international implications for the exporter.

Of particular concern are shipped wastes deemed to have been:

  • misrepresented;
  • don’t “conform in a material way” with the manifest documents; or
  • result in deliberate disposal (i.e. dumping) in contravention of:
    • the Basel Convention; or
    • “general principles of international law”.

In other words, the contents of the shipments must get a fully description and all material must fully conform to such description. The host country regulator, now a direct participant in waste transfers, will ensure this takes place.

With the Plastics Amendments, exporters of end-of-life plastics should be aware that the Basel Convention includes a “Protocol on Liability and Compensation“, which exposes export nations (and indirectly domestic recycling industries) to potentially significant damage claims for improper exports under the Basel Convention. The stakes in the trade of global plastics and e-waste have risen considerably.

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide to the subject matter. Specialist advice should be sought about your specific circumstances.

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About the Author

Jonathan Cocker, Partner at BLG LLP, provides advice and representation to multinational companies on a variety of environmental and product compliance matters, including extended producer responsibilities, dangerous goods transportation, GHS, regulated wastes, consumer product and food safety, and contaminated lands matters. He assisted in the founding of one of North America’s first Circular Economy Producer Responsibility Organizations and provides advice and representation to a number of domestic and international industry groups in respect of resource recovery obligations.

City of Hamilton charged for Odour Issues from Composting Facility

The City Hamilton, Ontario along with several contractors was recently charged under the Ontario Environmental Protection Act in connection with odour issues at its Central Composting Facility.  The specific charges are that the City, along with contractors for the composting facility, discharged or permitted the discharge of a contaminate (odour) contrary to the Environment Protection Act.

The charge relates to issues at the composting facility back in 2018.  At that time, there were numerous odour complaints from residents living near the facility.  The odour issues resulted in the facility be ordered to shut down at the time.

After modifications to better control odour issues, the facility reopened in 2019.  It ran a one-third capacity and only accepted grass and leaf & yard waste.  A third-party was also hired to patrol the area surrounding facility to monitor for air quality impacts, though that effort is now over.

The city-owned facility opened in 2006 and is operated by Aim Environmental Group. It initially handled compost generated by Hamilton, Halton and Simcoe County — the equivalent of 60,000 tonnes per year, from roughly 1,668,000 people.

The city says it received a summons from the Ministry of Environment on Nov. 25 and is required to appear before the Ontario Court of Justice on Feb. 3.  The Environment Ministry launched an investigation following complaints about the odour and the city says it has fully cooperated.

StormFisher to Open Source Separated Organics Processing Centre in Southwestern Ontario

StormFisher Biogas, headquartered in London, Ontario, recently opened a new Resource Recovery Centre in southwestern Ontario.  The new facility, located in the Village of Drumbo, receives and processes municipal source separated organics and packaged food waste.  The incoming material is processed and is then supplied to either StormFisher’s anaerobic digesters in London or is sent to third party digesters.

The facility also provides witnessed destruction through the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and certificates of destruction are available upon request.

The materials accepted at the new facility include municipal source separated organics (SSO), industrial, commercial and institutional (IC&I) waste, packaged food waste, liquid food waste, and solid food waste

The site is 4.29 hectares in area. The facility processes solid organic waste to produce products used in the agricultural industry. The facility receives up to 816 tonnes per day from an Ontario-wide service area. All waste is received, stored and processed indoors. The processing will include sorting, shredding, grinding and screening. The facility will process waste up to 24 hours per day, 7 days per week.

Expansion Plans for Twin Creeks Landfill in Southwestern Ontario

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Waste Management Canada is planning on seeking the approval of the Ontario Ministry of Environment, Conservation and Parks (MECP) to expand its landfill operation in southwestern Ontario.  The existing landfill, which opened in 1972 is expected to reach capacity in 2032.  If the MECP grants the company the right to expand, it will be possible to keep the landfill in operation until 2044.

As reported in the Sarnia Observer, the Mayor Jackie Rombouts of Watford Township (the municipality in which the landfill is located) stated the announcement of the expansion plans by Waste Management Canada was not welcome news.  “Obviously, it’s not something that our community wants,” she said in an interview with the Sarnia Observer. “We were looking forward to the end of this.”

The township receives landfill royalties, based on the amount of waste entering the site, that totalled about $4.4 million in 2019.  The initial concerns expressed by the municipality was the potential of 12 more years of truck traffic in the area and nuisance issues (i.e., odour and noise).

The company has started the long process of getting approval for the expansion by initiating an environmental assessment (EA).  An EA sets out a planning and decision-making process so that potential environmental effects are considered before a project begins.  It requires that the company seek input in the planning process from a variety of stakeholders including the local government, neighbours, indigenous groups, and others.

As reported in the the Sarnia Observer, Wayne Jenken, area landfill manager for Waste Management, said the environment assessment process is expected to take about five years and cost more than $35 million.  The typical timeline for an EA landfill expansion, from start to finish, is typically between three to five years.

The Notice of Commencement for the Terms of Reference was published on November 17, 2020. It seeks input from interested parties.

The proposed expansion will not involve an expansion in the existing landfill’s footprint.  Instead, the proposal calls for modifying the side slopes of the landfill as well as increasing its existing height.  Currently, the landfill site takes up approximately 300 hectares.  Of that, about 100 hectares are currently approved for landfilling.  If the expansion is granted, the maximum increase in the final height of the landfill could be 40 metres.

The remaining capacity of the existing landfill is Approximately 15 Million cubic metres.  The proposed expansion would provide additional airspace of up to approximately 14M m³.

One of the factors working in favour of the proposal getting approved is that fact that it is very difficult to get EA approval for a new landfill in the province, especially with new requirements that allows municipalities more say in the approval of a new landfill in their boundaries.  Also, study after study has shown that there is a dearth of landfill capacity in the province.

 

 

 

Canada Business Opportunity for Waste Management Entrepreneurs

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The Canadian government, through Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, recently issued a Food Waste Reduction Challenge to entrepreneurs that have concepts and demonstration projects to reduce the food waste, fight climate change, and strengthen food systems.  The prizes range from $100,000 to $1.5 million.  The Food Waste Reduction Challenge is currently accepting applications for Streams A and B. The deadline to apply is January 18, 2021.

Food Waste

Food Waste refers to all food that is grown, harvested, processed, manufactured or prepared for human consumption, but never eaten by people. It occurs at all stages of the food supply chain, from farm to plate.

In Canada and around the world, food waste continues to increase, resulting in an overuse of our natural resources such as water, soil and land, while contributing excess greenhouse gas emissions to our atmosphere. Meanwhile, a growing number of Canadians are facing food insecurity.

Over half of all food in Canada is wasted every year

Globally, food waste accounts for 8% of worldwide greenhouse gas emissions

1 in 7 Canadians suffer from food insecurity

In response, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), under the Food Policy for Canada, is launching the $20M Food Waste Reduction Challenge.

By encouraging more solutions to food waste in Canada, we can increase food availability, save consumers and businesses money, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and strengthen our food systems.

Challenge Streams

Food waste is a complex issue, and there is no single solution. That is why the Food Waste Reduction Challenge will include four complementary innovation streams. We know there are many great innovators out there who have high-impact solutions to tackle food waste throughout our food systems. Through the Challenge, we want to support innovators to establish and grow their solution in Canada.

Try our interactive tool to help you identify which stream is the best fit for your solution.

We are accepting applications for Challenge Streams A and B until January 18, 2021:

  • Challenge Stream A: Business models that prevent food waste
  • Challenge Stream B: Business models that divert food waste, food by-products and/or surplus food

The most promising solutions will be selected by an external committee of subject-matter experts. Innovators will receive grant funding as well as other benefits to help them succeed.

Streams A and B – Stages

Applicants will move through three stages to compete for the grand prize.

  • Stage 1 – Concept Application: Challenge Streams A and B are launched, and application intake begins on November 19, 2020, lasting until January 18, 2021.
  • Stage 2 – Market Demonstration Results: Beginning in Spring 2021, Semi-Finalists selected in Stage 1 will move on to Stage 2, where they will need to demonstrate the success of their solutions with an implementation partner in Canada over an eight-month period.
  • Stage 3 – Grow and Scale in Market: At this stage, Finalists selected in Stage 2 will grow and scale up their solutions in Canada over a one-year period starting in Spring 2022 and will be competing to be one of the Grand Prize Winners of the Challenge.
  • The Grand Prize Winners for The Food Waste Reduction Challenge – Streams A and B will be announced in Summer 2023.

Who Can Apply to a Challenge Stream?

Are you an innovator with a great solution that prevents and/or diverts food waste? Or are you trying to advance a technology that can extend the shelf-life of food or transform food waste? If so, the Food Waste Reduction Challenge is for you!

We are inviting innovators of all types and sizes to apply to one of the four streams of the Food Waste Reduction Challenge. International applicants with a Canadian partner or an ability to register to do business in Canada are encouraged to apply. Ideas and concepts can originate from anywhere globally, but to receive funding under the Challenge, the solutions presented in the submissions must be developed, tested, piloted, demonstrated, and deployed in Canada.

We are currently accepting applications for Challenge Streams A and B. Application intake for these streams closes January 18, 2021. Please see the Applicant Guide for more eligibility details. Applications for Streams C and D will open in Spring 2021.

Up to 30 Prizes of $100,000

Open to all eligible innovators submitting a concept application at Stage 1.

Up to 12 Prizes of $400,000

Open to all Semi-Finalists who reach Stage 2.

Up to 2 Grand Prizes of $1,500,000

Open to all Finalists who reach Stage 3.

Note: The number of winners and prize amounts may vary depending on the applications received.

Challenge details: Streams A and B

Who can apply?

  • Businesses and social enterprises of any size
  • Not-for-profit and charitable organizations
  • Indigenous organizations and groups
  • Post-secondary/academic institutions
  • Individuals or group of individuals

International applicants with a Canadian partner or an ability to register to do business in Canada are encouraged to apply.

Key Dates

  • Stage 1 – Concept Application Deadline: January 18, 2021
  • Up to 30 Semi-Finalists Announced: Late Winter/Early Spring 2021
  • Stage 2 Ends – Up to 12 Finalists Announced: Late Winter/Early Spring 2022
  • Stage 3 Ends – Grand Prize Winners Announced: Summer 2023

Prizes

  • Up to 30 Semi-Finalists will be selected in Stage 1 and will receive approximately $100,000
  • Semi-Finalists will move into Stage 2 and compete for a chance to be a Finalist and receive approximately $400,000
  • Up to 12 Finalists will compete in Stage 3 to win one of two Grand Prizes of up to $1,500,000

Note: The number of winners and prize amounts may vary depending on the applications received.


COVID-19 Lockdown Measures in Ontario and the Impact on Waste Management

The Ontario government is moving Peel Region and Toronto into Lockdown effective Monday, November 23, 2020 at 12:01am. Durham Region and Region of Waterloo will move to “Red-Control” level (restrictions across multiple sectors).

Lockdown measures and restrictions will largely affect retail establishments, restaurants, bars, sports and entertainment facilities, post-secondary schools, and meeting and event spaces, among others.

Waste Management Services Exempt from Lockdown

Under Section 34(ii) of Ontario Regulation 82/20, services and businesses that include “Collecting, transporting, storing, processing, disposing or recycling of any type of waste” are considered essential and exempt from lockdown measures. Also exempt are other businesses that supply other essential businesses or essential services within Ontario.

Regions will stay in their restriction level for 28 days (to Dec 21st), or two COVID-19 incubation periods, at which time, the government will assess the impact of public health measures to determine if the public health unit should stay where they are or be moved to a different level.

The following regions will be in the following restriction levels effective Monday, November 23, 2020 at 12:01 a.m.:
Lockdown (maximum measures) – GREY
• Peel Region*
• City of Toronto*

Control (stringent measures) – RED
• Durham Region*
• Region of Waterloo*
• City of Hamilton
• Halton Region
• York Region

Restrict (intermediate measures) – ORANGE
• Huron-Perth*
• Simcoe Muskoka District*
• Southwestern Public Health (Oxford, Elgin, St. Thomas)*
• Windsor-Essex County*
• Niagara Region
• Ottawa
• Wellington-Dufferin-Guelph

*NEW
Please read the Ontario COVID-19 Response Framework for details on which regions and which services and businesses are at different restriction levels. If you have questions about temporary measures, including closures and essential workplaces during the coronavirus outbreak, call Ontario’s Business Information Line at 1-888-444-3659.